e-mail

We have two ways of you to access your email, via the web or client.

The easiest way to start checking a new email account is to use a Webmail interface via the web: http://yourdomainname/webmail
This section covers the basics in setting up an email account using an email locally client installed on your computer, phone or other.

To access your hosting account mailboxes on our servers with an email client such as Outlook, iPhone, MacMail, or another client of your choice (either POP or IMAP with SMTP for sending mail), you have to configure it. You'll find the required configuration information/settings below: Ports in use for secure and non-secure protocols, excluding any custom ports that may be setup for you.

Service Insecure Secure Notes Access
POP 110 995 For receiving only e-mail client
SMTP 25 465,587 For sending only e-mail client
IMAP* 143 993 For syncing data across multiple clients e-mail client
HTTP HTTP 80 443 Webmail access (http://webmail.yourdomain)

*IMAP protocol is very sensitive to bandwidth issues, make sure your network or internet bandwidth is of sufficient quality and capacity.

Client-side configuration

  • Authentication: uses both full e-mail address and password e.g. username@yourdomain and password of your email account as default.
  • Incoming Mail Server: mail.domain
  • Outgoing Mail Server mail.domain
  • Supported Incoming Mail Protocols: POP3, POP3S (SSL/TLS), IMAP, IMAPS (SSL/TLS)
  • Supported Outgoing Mail Protocols: SMTP, SMTPS (SSL/TLS)

Internet access

Several ISP’s block port 25 outbound (SMTP) however they normally offer an alternative for relaying/sending mail, if you do not have external mail servers this is an option you can use, otherwise use the secure protocols/ports, if that fails we can give you a custom port to use.

Other Notes

  • Mac Mail IMAP Note: The "IMAP Path Prefix" needs to be set to INBOX otherwise Mail.app will not be able to store deleted, draft or sent mail on the server
  • Unless you have an SSL certificate needed for extra security (with CFTS this is provide free on most yearly hosting pakages)  then you will get SSL Error - Certificate Not Trusted, you can safely ignore this error.
on Saturday June 30 by Peter Atkin
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Passwords provide the first line of defence against unauthorised access to your organization.

It is now more common each and every day to hear reports of website breaches and leaks of customer data, often attacked are indirect crack a weaker system to get into another normally more secure subsystem, the role that passwords play in securing an organization's network both internal and external is often underestimated and overlooked.

Convenience as the Enemy of Security
Even with a complex, easy to remember passphrase, we sometimes get tired of typing it in. Especially for accounts we need to access regularly. In these cases, many people will opt to allow their browser to save their passwords for specific websites.

The problem with this is two-fold.
Firstly, if someone is able to open your browser, revealing all of your saved passwords takes only three mouse clicks. If you are using some browsers, which sync your account information across all devices you use, (including auto-filling your passwords…) then gaining access to your browser on one system could potentially give someone access to ALL devices you have synced to that account.

Secondly, we are also faced with the dilemma that we need to use passwords in so many different places, that most people end up using the same password for multiple accounts. So even if you only allow the browser to store one of your passwords, chances are pretty good that you’ve used the same password for at least three other accounts.

Try to
Use a different password for each of your important accounts, like your email, SQL database, Root, administrator passwords and so on, even the ones for your online banking accounts. Re-using passwords is risky. If someone figures out your password for one account, that person could potentially gain access to your email systems, admin accounts and much more.

Weak passwords provide attackers with easy access to your computers and network, while strong passwords are considerably harder to crack, even with the password-cracking software that is available today. Password-cracking tools continue to improve, and the computers that are used to crack passwords are more powerful than ever. 

Common methods of password cracking

Password-cracking software uses one of three approaches:
  • Intelligent guessing,
  • Dictionary attacks,
  • and Brute-force automated attacks,
that try every possible combination of characters. Given enough time, the automated method can crack any password. However, strong passwords are much harder to crack than weak passwords. A secure computer has strong passwords for all user accounts.. A Weak Password:
  • Is no password at all
  • Contains your user name, real name, or company name
  • Contains a complete dictionary word. For example, Password is a weak password.
A Strong Password:
  • Is at least eight characters long
  • Does not contain your user name, real name, or company name
  • Does not contain a complete dictionary word
  • Is significantly different from previous passwords. Passwords that increment (Password 1, Password 2, Password 3 ...) are not strong

Using numbers, symbols and mix of upper and lower case letters in your password makes it harder for someone to guess your password. For example, an eight-character password with numbers, symbols and mixed-case letters is harder to guess because it has 30,000 times as many possible combinations than an eight-character password with only lower case letters. Contains characters from each of the following four group

Upper Case Letters A, B, C …
Lower Case Letters a, b, c …
Numerals 0, 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Symbols ` ~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ + - = { } | \ : " ; ' < > ? , . /


Add an extra layer of security

Once you’ve created a password, you can add an extra layer of security by enabling 2-Step Verification. 2-Step Verification requires you to have access to your phone, as well as your username and password, when you sign in to your Google Account. This means that if someone steals or guesses your password, they still can't sign in to your account because they don't have your phone. Now you can protect yourself with something you know (your password) and something you have (your phone). Keep your passwords secure
Don't leave notes with your passwords to various sites on your computer or desk. People who walk by can easily steal this information and use it to compromise your account. If you decide to save your passwords in a file on your computer the use a trusted password manager may be a good solution.

Having a Secure password is good practice to follow, and can save you time, money, data and maybe your life?

on Saturday July 14 by Peter Atkin
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The following article will guide you through configuring your email on an Android device.

Before you start, be sure you have these handy:

  • Your domain name: yourdomainname as an exanple 'computer-facilities.com'
  • Your email address: account@yourdomainname
  • Your email password:
  • The Incoming and Outgoing Mail Server name is the same mail.yourdomainname

All Android devices come with the Gmail app, and Android prompts you to sign in to Gmail or create an account the first time you turn on your phone.

The Accounts section in the Settings menu has an option to set up additional Gmail accounts or other email accounts using your providers' incoming and outgoing server settings.

  • If no account has been set: Tap through the welcome screen, and tap Add email address. Next, choose Other
  • If an account has already been set: Tap the three-line icon on the top left-hand corner, then the arrow icon to the right of the account name that has already been set. Next, tap Add account, and choose Other
  • Enter your email address, then click Next.
  • When you choose an account type, select IMAP then enter your email password. Click Next to continue with the configuration
  • Enter incoming server settings:
  • Username: Enter your full email address
  • Password: Enter the password for your email address
  • Server: Enter the server: mail.yourdomainname
  • Security type: SSL/TLS
  • Port: 993
  • Tap Next, then enter the outgoing server settings:
  • Username: Enter your full email address
  • Password: Enter the password for your email address
  • SMTP server: mail.yourdomainname
  • Security type: SSL/TLS
  • Port: 465 or 587.

Then tap Next. If all the information you have entered is correct, you will be able to log in to your account straight away

The native Email app doesn't come with all devices, but it's available free in the Play Store.

on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and TLS (Transport Layer Security) are cryptographic schemes that allow a visitor’s web browser to communicate securely with a web server. All sensitive data (credit card numbers, login information, etc.) that is transmitted over the Internet should be protected by SSL/TLS. TLS is simply the more recent version of SSL.

Which is more secure – SSL or TLS?
TLS v1.0 is marginally more secure than SSL v3.0, its predecessor. However, subsequent versions of TLS — v1.1 and v1.2 are significantly more secure and fix many vulnerabilities present in SSL v3.0 and TLS v1.0. For example, the BEAST attack that can completely break web sites running on older SSL v3.0 and TLS v1.0 protocols. The newer TLS versions, if properly configured, prevent the BEAST and other attack vectors and provide many stronger ciphers and encryption methods.

so: In terms of security they both for now considered equally secure.

The main difference is that, while SSL connections begin with security and proceed directly to secured communications, TLS connections first begin with an insecure “hello” to the server and only switch to secured communications after the handshake between the client and the server is successful. If the TLS handshake fails for any reason, the connection is never created.

Unfortunately, even now a majority of web sites do not use the newer versions of TLS and permit weak encryption ciphers, CFTS servers support both SSL and TLS as standard, for web and e-mail access.

on Saturday July 14 by Peter Atkin
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The following article will guide you through configuring your email on an Apple/iOS device.

Before you start, be sure you have these handy:

  • Your domain name: yourdomainname as an exanple 'computer-facilities.com'
  • Your email address: account@yourdomainname
  • Your email password:
  • The Incoming and Outgoing Mail Server name is the same mail.yourdomainname

On your device’s homepage, go to Settings. There are two ways of adding an account, depending on the iOS version you are using:

  • For iOS 7, 8, 9 and 10: Go to Mail, Contacts, Calendar, then Add account. Choose Other, then Add a Mail account.
  • For iOS 11: Go to Accounts and passwords, then Add account. Choose Other, then Add a Mail account
  • Enter your account information:
  • Name: Enter the sender name that you wish to be displayed when sending emails from this address
  • Email Address: Enter your full email address
  • Password: Enter your email address password
  • Description: Enter a name that will distinguish this account from any other accounts added in your Mail App
  • Tap Next, and enter the information requested:
  • IMAP or POP: Leave IMAP selected by default
  • Host name (Incoming): Enter the mail server: mail.yourdomainname
  • SSL: Yes
  • Port: 993
  • Username (incoming): Enter your full email address
  • Password (incoming): Enter your email address’ password
  • Hostname (outgoing): Enter the mail server: mail.yourdomainname
  • SSL: Yes
  • Port: 465 or 587.
  • Username (outgoing): Enter your full email address
  • Password (outgoing): Enter your email address’ password
  • Then tap Next. If all the information you have entered is correct, you will be able to log in to your account straight away
  • When you are asked to select the apps you want to use with your account, ensure that Mail is ticked, so the application will work correctly with your email address.
  • You should then tap Save.
  • To check that the account has been correctly configured, you can send a test email
on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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The following article will guide you through configuring your email on an macOS such as El Capitan, Sierra and High Sierra

Before you start, be sure you have tthis information handy:

Once you have launched the Mail app on your device, you can add an account in two different ways:

  • When you open the app for the first time: A window will appear, asking you to select a service provider for your Mail account. Select Other Mail account, then continue.
  • If you have already added an account: Click Mail at the top of your screen, then Add account. Select Other Mail account, then continue.
  • Enter your account information:
  • Name: Enter the sender name that you wish to be displayed when sending emails from this address.
  • Email address: Enter your full email address.
  • Password: Enter the password for your email address.
  • Click on the Log in button. A message will appear prompting you to continue, then enter the following information:
  • Account type: Leave IMAP selected in the drop-down menu.
  • Incoming server Enter the mail server: mail.yourdomainname
  • SSL: Yes
  • Port: 993
  • Outgoing server Enter the mail server: mail.yourdomainname
  • SSL: Yes
  • Port: 465 or 587.
  • Click again on the Log in button. If all the information you have entered is correct, you will be able to log in to your account straight away
  • When you are asked to select the apps you want to use with your account, ensure that Mail is ticked so that the application works correctly with your email address, then click Done.
  • To check that the account has been correctly configured, you can send a test email
on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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The following article will guide you through configuring your email on an Android device.

Before you start, be sure you have tthis information handy:

Once you have launched the Outlook app on your device, you can add an account in two different ways:

  • When you start the application for the first time: A setup wizard will appear and prompt you to enter your email address.
  • If you have already added an account: Click File in the menu bar at the top of your screen, then Add account.
  • Enter your email address, then click Advanced options. Tick the box that appears next to Let me set up my account manually, then click Connection. Select IMAP from the list of account types.
  • Then fill in the information requested:
  • Incoming Mail Server: Enter the mail server “mail.yourdomainname
  • Port: Enter port 993
  • Encryption method: Select SSL/TLS.
  • Requiring authentication: Do not tick the “Require secure password authentication (SPA) on connection” box.
  • Outgoing Server: Enter the mail server “mail.yourdomainname”.
  • Port: Enter port 465 or 587.
  • Encryption method: Select “SSL/TTLS”.
  • Requiring authentication: Do not tick the “Require secure password authentication (SPA) on connection” box.
  • Once you have entered this information, click Next and enter your email address’ password. If all the information you have entered is correct, you will be able to log in to your account straight away.
  • To check that the account has been correctly configured, you can send a test email.
on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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The following article will guide you through configuring your email useing Outlook 2016 on the Mac

Before you start, be sure you have tthis information handy:

Once you have launched Outlook on your device, you can add an account in two different ways

  • When you start the application for the first time. A setup wizard will appear and prompt you to enter your email address.
  • If you have already added an account. Click Tools in the menu bar at the top of your screen, then Accounts. In the window that pops up, click +, then New account.
  • Enter your email address, then click Continue. For the provider, click on IMAP/POP, then enter the information requested
  • Account type: Leave IMAP (selected by default).
  • Mail address: Enter a name that will distinguish this account from any other accounts added in your Outlook app.
  • Username: Enter your full email address.
  • Password: Enter the password for your email address.
  • Incoming server : Enter the mail server “mail.yourdomainname”. Leave the "Use SSL to connect" box ticked.
  • Incoming port: Enter port 993.
  • Outgoing server : Enter the mail server “mail.yourdomainname”. Leave the "Use SSL to connect" box ticked.
  • Outgoing port: Enter port 465 or 587.
  • Once you have entered this information, click Next. If the information is correct, Outlook will successfully connect to the account.
  • To check that the account has been configured correctly, you can send a test email.
on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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To log in to your webmail application, enter the following in your address bar:

if this is the foirst time you logged int then you we be asked to chose your prefured webmail application:

  • Horde
  • Squirrel Mail
  • Round cube

http://yourdomainname/webmail

on Wednesday July 18 by Peter Atkin
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